Click one of the buying options below to be re-directed:




Fitbit Blaze (Small)


£100.00

In Stock

Go to site

£106.99

In Stock

Go to site

£119.99

In Stock

Go to site

£119.99

In Stock

Go to site

£119.99

In Stock

Go to site


Fitbit Blaze (Large)


£93.99

In Stock

Go to site

£106.99

In Stock

Go to site

£119.99

In Stock

Go to site

£119.99

In Stock

Go to site

£119.99

In Stock

Go to site
Please note that in order to provide a fair price comparison, eBay prices are for new (buy it now) items only. Cheaper second-hand options or auction items may exist. We recommend that you visit eBay to see all the buying options available.

Smartwatch? Activity Tracker? Sports Watch? It’s getting harder and harder to categorise wearables in 2016 and the Fitbit Blaze (on surface at least) is no exception (#firstworldbloggerproblems).

Whether you consider the Blaze a pimped-up Charge HR or simply a sexier Surge, you can tell Fitbit are trying desperately to bridge that gap, introducing some smartwatch functions (and looks) to a reliable activity tracker from an already established brand. But have Fitbit managed to hit that magic sweet spot by balancing function, style and accuracy? Or will a lack of some key features (*cough* built-in GPS) and too much emphasis on design see it just miss the mark like so many before it?

Let’s take a look at the latest fitness watch to join the Fitbit family – The Fitbit Blaze.

 

Clone Wars…

I know it’s been said over and over again, but I can’t do a review of the Fitbit Blaze without mentioning the big fat elephant in the room.

While I’m not going to start using the words ‘copy’, ‘clone’, or ‘impersonation’ here, I’m also not going to say that the Fitbit Blaze is completely unique upon first impressions. It’s not, and if you’ve got an Apple Watch, I’m sure you’ll agree.

Now obviously the Fitbit Blaze and the Apple Watch are two very different products technically. But aesthetically… Well, let’s put it this way – No one would blame you for trying to get an answer from Siri through your Fitbit.

However, the design is groundbreaking for Fitbit. It’s the first Fitbit to feature a coloured touchscreen screen and it’s the most ‘watch-like’ tracker Fitbit has introduced thus far (definitely a step up from the almost-there-but-not-quite Surge). Fitbit have also done away with their usual clasp, opting for a more traditional watch strap and buckle making it much more secure, matched only by it’s big bro (the Fitbit Surge). However unlike the Surge, the band on the Blaze isn’t fixed (choose from leather, metal or the classic Fitbit band) giving it an overall more high-end feel and allowing a more seamless transition from the gym and the work place to a night on the town. Pssst… interchangeable bands are also handy if the strap were to say break (+2 points for longevity).

Not bad at all if you’ve been keeping your fingers crossed for an activity tracker that doesn’t look like an activity tracker. But with smartwatches introducing new innovative ways to track your fitness and keep you up-to-date with how many pies Larry ate today whilst doing so almost sub-autonomously (sans phone) – is looking like a smartwatch enough? Come on, we’re not that shallow.

 

And For The Win

Love the style or hate it, there’s much, much more to the Fitbit Blaze than how it looks. And, there’s actually some really great features that are being overlooked because all we can talk about is how it’s similar to an Apple Watch.

If we look at the Blaze, which we can reasonably say is a middle-of-the-line product, and the Fitbit Surge (which is currently the top-of-the-range headliner product) there’s really not that many differences. In fact, in terms of what it can do, the only thing that’s missing from the Blaze is built-in GPS. Would it be nice to have this? Sure. But this is a multi-sport watch after-all. So unless you’re an outdoors distance runner or about to run a marathon, you’ll likely have your smartphone near-by anyway which is where connected GPS comes into play. If you were tempted by the all-singing all-dancing Moto 360 Sport (like me), I’m sure you would agree that built-in GPS has its (battery zapping) downfalls. So perhaps Fitbit can be forgiven.

Otherwise, the Blaze gives us pretty much everything the Surge does, but for a lower price. You’ve got your continuous heart rate monitor, your multi-sport function, your music control, your text and call notifications and so on. It’s as if Fitbit have taken all the very best features from the Surge and compiled them all into a more budget-friendly tracker. Ding-ding-ding we have a winner!

Fitbit have really taken a couple of giant leaps with the Blaze, that honestly, could have gone either way considering how nobody likes change. However, I think they have really paid off. The Blaze is (of course) the very first Fitbit wearable tracker to feature a colour screen. Fitbit took its sweet time in introducing a colour screen, but they got there in the end. And while it doesn’t exactly enhance the features of the watch, it just makes it a bit nicer to use. That said, time will only tell how much of a drain this has on the battery.

I know, I know, you want to be reading about the exciting new features of the Fitbit Blaze, not listening to me ramble on about battery life. And I promise that I won’t, but we’ve got to get these boring bits covered, too.

If you’ve got a Fitbit already, you can take a good guess at how the battery life is – it’s good (up to 5 days depending on usage). In fact, as there’s no built-in GPS like the Surge, you’ll probably find that your battery lasts a little longer (there you go, there are some good points about missing features!). With GPS, the Surge goes from 7 days to 10 hours on a single charge. The Blaze however can last up to 5 days. A little less than the Surge without GPS, but that’s what you get for colour touchscreen – something has to give.

Accuracy, again, it’s pretty much what you expect from a Fitbit, which is that activity tracking is usually on point, although calories burned can be overestimated at times (don’t we all wish we could burn 100 calories just by walking to the loo!).

Also something else worth noting is that the Blaze is the first Fitbit to be launched after the company acquired FitStar and is currently the only device by them to use it. This on-screen workout feature was a major talking point when the Blaze was first introduced and for good reason. Long term exercisers may think it’s a little amateurish however (and they’d be right), but for newbies who need a little inspiration, Fitbit have really got it spot with these on-screen step-by-step workouts.

 

Getting There

Overall, I’m a little bit in love with the Fitbit Blaze. The Charge HR, the Flex, the Alta, sure Fitbits are becoming more… er – ‘stylish’ (I suppose), but you’re still not going to convince anyone that you’re not monitoring your steps. With the Blaze however, you may just get away with it. TBH, it feels like I’m cheating the system a little bit by having most of the features of the Surge but without the price tag. If this is the way Fitbit products are going, then sign me up for more! I just wish it had GPS so that I can track my runs, but maybe it’s time to just join a gym!?

What’s in the Box

  • Fitbit Blaze Tracker
  • Classic Wristband (leather and metal wristbands and casings are available separately)
  • Charging Cable
Fitbit Blaze
Want an activity tracker that doesn't look like an activity tracker? Well the Fitbit Blaze might be the wearable you've been looking for. If you can forgive lack of built-in GPS that is.
Design70%
Usability75%
Battery Life75%
Features88%
77%Overall Score
Reader Rating: (2 Votes)
67%